About Me

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Documenting a period in my development that could become pivotal

Sunday, January 27, 2008

Looking Back and Thoughtful Development of Modular Frame Series

" Ruth's Pond" ,1961, oil on Belgium linen, 29" x 38" for sale $400
During school vacation I painted outdoors at a friend's house. This is a style I come round to and develop.

"Yellow experimental abstract", acrylic with balsa wood relief, 1966 For sale $180

"My Table: My Palette", oil on canvas supported by wood and plywood corners, 32" x 43" , 1990. For sale $400 The support frame was scavenged from an earlier experiment - a silk painting stretched over fiber fill to make the wall hanging look like soft fiber sculpture.


Like in the past the modular frame series could be an isolated series of abstracts. I don't want to crank them out. Each must have meaning for me and be a part of my goal to have a rich involvement that I hope will evolve into a rich development. Each will start without knowing what adventure I will have to achieve the resolution. The resolution will be the recognition of feeling and symbolism that communicates. Usually development comes from limits and repeating the same type of picture. I have taken the path of trying many directions and there has been a great deal of time since my first similar paintings. When I am doing other kinds of painting new ideas for these abstracts incubate. At least incubation is the excuse I use for not pursuing abstraction continually.

Looking at these I feel I have just begun to stretch my muscle for abstraction by working at it now and then during the years.

2 comments:

rob ijbema said...

love this,there is a certain depth
in more than one way,very intersting

Parapluie said...

Thank you Rob,

If one looks very closely at "My Table, My Palette" I have painted myself holding a bag out to catch the colors. I feel the figure is passive here. In my most recent modular frames I am more proactive and also wanting to share my love of paint and color by making the modulars so others can rearrange the colors, and textures.